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Stanley Park Ecology Scociety Bird Count- November 2011

Posted by birder on Tuesday, November 8, 2011
I participated in the SPES bird count for November yesterday. The most interesting bird we found was a Gadwall on Beaver Lake. The Gadwall is a pretty common bird in the Lower Mainland, but it doesn't commonly show up on Beaver Lake.

When I arrived for the count, there was a Great Blue Heron sitting around three feet from shore. There were already other bird counters there watching it. I find that the herons in Stanley Park are very tame, but usually not this time. Here are some uncropped photos I got:

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Soon after, the heron flew away. The count started, and the first waterbirds we counting were Goldeneyes and Mergansers. They were far away but I still took some photos.

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We moved on and saw some Coots, Scaups Mallards, and Geese. One of the geese was a Cackling Goose that was hardly bigger than a Mallard. Here are photos of the American Coots, Lesser Scaups, and the Cackling Goose:

American Coot
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Cackling Goose
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Lesser Scaup
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After the ducks and geese, I noticed a juvenile Pied-billed Grebe. I pointed it out to the group. It was far away, but I still took some photos.

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The group continued walking, counting all the birds we saw and heard. There were chickadees, sparrows, and towees. There was also a Domestic Duck and a Domestic Duck x Mallard Hybrid. Then there was a heron. Here is a photo of that heron:

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We soon came to the stone bridge at Laggoon. Here there were many songbirds, mainly including Spotted Towhees, Golden-crowned, Fox, and Song Sparrows, and Black-capped Chickadees. Here are from photos from this spot:

Spotted Towhees
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Golden-crowned Sparrow
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After some more walking and counting what we saw and heard, we came across a Golden-crowned Kinglet. Earlier in the count, We could here kinglets but this was the first time we could see one.

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Underneath the tree with the kinglet, there was a very large Fox Sparrow. It allowed me to get very close, and seemed very lazy and tired. The person leading the count said that it was probably tired from its long migration that it just finished.

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Later on, when we arrived at Beaver Lake, the first interesting thing and probably the most interesting thing we saw a Beaver Lake was this male Gadwall, a bird that is usually not sighted at Beaver Lake. Here is one of the photos I took:

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A little bit past the Gadwall we could see a Bald Eagle sitting on a tree very far away. Here is a photo:

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And a bit past the tree with the eagle there was a bush with many Chestnut-backed Chickadees, as well as a single Pacific Wren.

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Near where the beaver lodge is, I took this photo of a male Wood Duck and the following photo of a male Hooded Merganser, which was one of seven other Hooded Mergansers.

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Near the end of beaver lake there were more Song Sparrows and Chickadees. Here are two photos of a Song Sparrow and a Chestnut-backed Chickadee from that time:

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Here are a few other photos I took on the count:

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