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Rufous Hummingbirds in Stanley Park - April 18 2014

Posted by Liron on Sunday, April 20, 2014
In the afternoon of April 18, I went to Lost Lagoon in Stanley Park. That target bird was the Rufous Hummingbird. This is a species that I see every year, but for some reason I have never managed to get good photos. Today, I hoped to get some nice shots of them.

Almost immediately after arriving, I got my first hummingbird: an Anna's Hummingbird, male. I walked a little farther on the trail and almost right away heard what I was looking for: a Rufous Hummingbird! Actually, there were many calling all over the place, but the buzzing sound they make is very hard to pinpoint, especially when they are in flight! I noticed a male coming to the flowers on a salmonberry bush, so I set up beside it and waited.

It wasn't long before he came back, and I got some nice shots including this one:

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I noticed another bird photographer by the water, and I went over to say hi. It was Terry (Nikon-gearhead), and we teamed up. Another bird photographer named Peter then showed up. Peter comes to the park all the time and knows it better than any other bird photographer that I know, so he led us to a spot that he knew to be very good for Rufous Hummingbirds.

On the way many more hummers were busy feeding on the Salmonberry, and I stopped for a few shots. I should mention that I was shooting with a handheld Canon EOS Rebel T1i (and my usually 400mm f/5.6), because my Canon EOS 60D was in for sensor cleaning. The T1i is still a good camera, but the focusing accuracy and speed doesn't compare to the 60D.

Anyways, back the hummingbirds. Peter led us to his spot, and we were definitely happy! Rufous Hummingbirds were everywhere, feeding on walls of salmonberry. We stuck around for a couple hours, and got some great shots! I was longing for the 60D, but the T1i still served me fairly well:

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Between feedings, the hummingbirds would perch, usually deep in the salmonberry bushes. Though they perched deep in the bushes, you could sometimes find a small gap where you could get a pretty clear shot:

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It was getting late in the afternoon and I had to head home. Just before I left, this Hammond's Flycatcher, my first of the year, stopped by for a minute:

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It was a great afternoon! I achieved the hummingbird pictures I wanted to get, so I was very happy!


Thanks for looking... :)




 

 

 

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